Guava Ground Gets Electricity

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Residents of Guava Ground, in Clarendon, are happier, now that electricity has been turned on in their area.The first set of street lights were turned on in the area, on February 5, under the Rural Electrification Programme (REP), through which 16 households will also be provided with electricity.“I would like to see a ceremony like this every week in every community that is in need of light,” State Minister in the Ministry of Mining and Telecommunications, Laurence Broderick, said at the ceremony.He pointed out that there are other communities in Clarendon that are without electricity, and assured that plans are in progress to bring change to those communities.“We will march on in that respect, to bring light to communities that should have long ago been in the 21st Century,” he said.Meanwhile, Garfield Williams, a resident, told JIS News that he is happy for the electricity.“I am very happy for the lights. I have been living here for 36 years now and it is the very first time that I am seeing something like this and I hope that we can see many more happenings like this again,” Mr. Williams said.James McLean, another resident, said that he has been living in Guava Ground for some 70 years, and the commissioning of the street lights was a major experience for him.“In all my 70 years in Guava Ground, this is the first time that we have acquired anything,” he told JIS News, and thanked all those who have worked hard in order to bring electricity to the community.The REP was formed in 1975 by the Government, to bring electricity to all rural communities throughout the island.Since the beginning of the programme, Clarendon has benefitted tremendously, as approximately 533 kilometres of distribution lines have been built and 7,000 houses wired. Guava Ground Gets Electricity TechnologyFebruary 9, 2009 Advertisements RelatedGuava Ground Gets Electricitycenter_img RelatedGuava Ground Gets Electricity RelatedGuava Ground Gets Electricitylast_img read more

Details of Compensation scheme for London Capital & Finance bond holders announced

first_imgDetails of Compensation scheme for London Capital & Finance bond holders announced Due to the unique and exceptional nature of the situation concerning London Capital & Finance (LCF), the government will establish a scheme that provides 80% of LCF bondholders’ initial investment up to a maximum of £68,000. Where bondholders have received interest payments from LCF or distributions from the administrators, Smith & Williamson, these will be deducted from the amount of compensation payable.The scheme will be available to all LCF bondholders who have not already received compensation from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS) and represents 80% of the compensation they could have received had they been eligible for FSCS protection, which is capped at £85,000.Economic Secretary to the Treasury, John Glen said:This has been a very difficult time for LCF bondholders, many of whom are elderly and have lost their hard-earned savings.It is an important point of principle that government does not step in to pay compensation in respect of failed financial services firms that fall outside the Financial Services Compensation Scheme.However, the situation regarding LCF is unique and exceptional and the government has decided to establish a compensation scheme for LCF bondholders in this instance. The scheme appropriately balances the interests of both bondholders and the taxpayer and will ensure that all LCF bondholders receive a fair level of compensation in respect of the financial loss they have suffered.The existing Financial Services Compensation Scheme is strictly limited in scope and it is only able to pay out when a relevant regulated activity has been undertaken. The FSCS has considered LCF claims in detail and has been able to protect around 2,800 bondholders, paying out over £57 million in compensation.Around 97% of all LCF bondholders invested less than £85,000 and therefore will not reach the compensation cap under either the government scheme or the FSCS. The government expects to pay out around £120 million compensation to around 8,800 people in total and to have paid all bondholders within 6 months of securing the necessary primary legislation, which it will bring forward as soon as parliamentary time allows.Bondholders should be vigilant to the risk of scammers posing as services to help them claim. They do not need to do anything at this stage and government will provide /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:compensation, Elderly, finance, financial services, Government, Investment, legislation, London, Loss, Secretary, taxpayer, UK, UK Governmentlast_img read more

A 34-year-old is among latest victims of COVID-19 in Clark County

first_imgThree deaths and 76 new cases have been reported since ThursdayCLARK COUNTY — Until this week, the last death related to COVID-19 was reported on June 22. Just since Thursday, three more deaths have been added to the total, including a 34-year old who passed away earlier in the week and apparently had no underlying health conditions.Danh Tran, 34, died Tuesday of complications related to COVID-19. He reportedly had no underlying health conditions. Photo via FacebookDanh Tran, 34, died Tuesday of complications related to COVID-19. He reportedly had no underlying health conditions. Photo via FacebookIn a July 8 post on Facebook, Tran’s fiance, Jessica Salamanca, wrote about Tran’s tragic death.“To say I’m heartbroken doesn’t even begin to cover the surface,” she wrote. “My heart hurts, my body hurts, and I just want to wake up from this nightmare.”The Clark County Medical Examiner’s office confirmed Tran died on July 7, and listed the cause of death as “acute respiratory illness” due to “Novel Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).”In a Go Fund Me page for Tran’s burial expenses, Mark Woodford described Tran as “one of the most genuine, caring, real guys out there.”“More than that he was a fiancé and soon to be the husband to his beloved Jessica,” Woodford wrote. “A father figure to her brother and now their worlds are shattered.”The couple had planned to marry this Summer, but postponed to August of next year due to the pandemic. They had still intended to buy a house together, and were set to close on a place this week.Danh Tran, who died this week of COVID-19, with his fiance, Jessica Salamanca. Photo via FacebookDanh Tran, who died this week of COVID-19, with his fiance, Jessica Salamanca. Photo via Facebook“This leaves my younger brother and I with no choice but to move out of our current residence,” wrote Salamanca, “as I cannot step foot in the door.”There were few details about how Tran may have contracted the virus, or what led to his seemingly sudden death. Woodford noted that the death was unexpected, and had left friends and family of the 34-year-old feeling “shaken, saddened, and scared.”“Most of the mortality we’re seeing with this disease is in older populations,” said Clark County Public Health Officer Dr. Alan Melnick on Thursday, “but it hits home that it can be a severe disease in young people as well.”Two additional deaths FridayOn Friday, two more deaths were confirmed by Clark County Public Health, as well as 38 more confirmed cases, bringing the total to 32 deaths and 1,166 cases. Since Monday, the county has added 158 confirmed cases.The latest graph showing the trend of COVID-19 in Clark County. Image via Clark County Public HealthThe latest graph showing the trend of COVID-19 in Clark County. Image via Clark County Public HealthThe latest deaths included a woman in her 50s, with an underlying health condition, and a man in his 80s. It was undetermined if that death included underlying medical issues.Hospitalization rates remained largely unchanged Friday, with 20 confirmed cases and 12 suspected, comprising 5.1 percent of the occupied beds, with 32 of the county’s licenced hospital beds unused currently.Protesters descend on Public Health buildingA group of protesters led by People’s Rights Washington and Patriot Prayer marched to the Clark County Public Health building on Thursday afternoon, seeking answers to their questions.Rob Anderson, who goes by the handle The Recovering Pastor on Facebook, helped put the protest together and says they believe the county has been dishonest with the information they’re putting out.“For example, the county is not willing to detail or give out the underlying health concerns,” he said. “And the reason why that’s important is because how they define COVID death.”Rob Anderson (left) at a rally against Clark County Public Health on Thursday. Also pictured are Joey Gibson of Patriot Prayer and Kelli Stewart of People’s Rights Washington. Photo via FacebookRob Anderson (left) at a rally against Clark County Public Health on Thursday. Also pictured are Joey Gibson of Patriot Prayer and Kelli Stewart of People’s Rights Washington. Photo via FacebookAnderson believes the death toll likely includes people who’ve died of things unrelated to COVID-19, but are added to the total if they simply tested positive at some point.Melnick confirms that their current practice is to report deaths involving a COVID-19 diagnosis as a “COVID associated death.”Admittedly, that could include someone who had COVID-19 and died of a heart attack, but the state eventually reviews all death certificates and would remove any cases such as that.“At this point in Clark County, the state has not removed any COVID associated deaths from the total,” Melnick noted. In fact, he said, it’s more likely that there are deaths earlier this year that were labeled as being caused by pneumonia which may have actually been due to COVID-19, so the current count may be low.Clark County Public Health Officer Dr. Alan Melnick during a press conference in March. Photo by Mike SchultzClark County Public Health Officer Dr. Alan Melnick during a press conference in March. Photo by Mike Schultz“Nobody’s out there to exaggerate the number of COVID-19 associated deaths,” Melnick adds. “We’re trying to be as accurate as we can about it.”When Anderson and his group arrived at the county Public Health building shortly after 4 p.m. on Thursday, they found the building empty and the doors locked, plus extra security around the building.“This is no way for a ‘Public’ Health Dept to operate,” he wrote in a letter to Clark County Chair Eileen Quiring following the protest.Anderson and others who attended the protest say they also believe the county is being misleading in how it reports hospitalization data, alleging that most people who are admitted now are being tested for the virus, which could lead to inflated data about the situation.“Someone could be in delivering a baby, have an aneurysm, cancer, whatever it is. Something that’s completely unrelated,” says Anderson. “And, based on their definition, the public thinks that they have COVID-19 or whatever.”Melnick says there’s some truth to that, but they’re required to report the data.“There’s a whole list of notifiable conditions, and COVID-19 is on the list,” Melnick says. “When a physician sees the lab has a positive test, or the hospital is aware of an admission with COVID-19, they’re required by law to report it.”What they’re not required to report, Melnick adds, is whether the person is specifically in the hospital because of the COVID-19 infection.In some ways it doesn’t matter, he adds, since someone with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis is going to need to be treated with similar precautions, including isolation and more use of PPE, which means they’re a similar drain on resources whether it’s a serious case of the illness or not.On the issue of wearing masks, the protesters believe it is about enforcing compliance with a government mandate, not about a virus.“We will not comply with lawlessness, we will not comply with abuse,” said Kelli Stewart during a Facebook livestream of their protest. “No way. That’s not the American spirit, that’s the Chinese spirit, and we are not Chinese, we are Americans. If they want compliance without anybody asking questions, then they better figure out a way to swap out flags.”Melnick says, as someone who has studied infectious diseases for 30 years, it frustrates him to see a scientific issue become one centered around political ideology.“One of the things that concerns me the most is we take something that’s a biological phenomenon, where we’re learning more about this disease, and it’s turned into some sort of political issue,” says Melnick. “Which it’s not. You know, we’re trying to prevent disease transmission.”The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a unique challenge to health departments across the country at every level.The system simply wasn’t designed to provide the level of contextual detail many people are currently demanding about this pandemic, Melnick says, especially when the levels of public skepticism are so high.“We’re trying to be as accurate as possible with the science,” Melnick says, while admitting that there are complexities in doing so. “I do want people to wear masks, but I’m gonna be honest about what they do and what they don’t do. I’m not gonna say ‘you put on a mask and you’re 90 percent protected,’ because I don’t have evidence that it does that. But I do have evidence that putting on a mask substantially reduces your risk of passing the disease on to other people. That may not be as effective an argument, but it’s a truth.”Obviously, the protesters don’t agree completely.“It’s one thing when you’re dealing with people who, you know, ‘I’m answering your questions freely here,’” says Anderson. “But you get into situations where you have to ask the right way, in order to get the right answers, and if you don’t, you get kind of slippery answers.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyCovid-19LatestVancouvershare 0 Previous : WATCH: Clark County TODAY LIVE • Friday, July 10, 2020 Next : Elections: State representative, 49th Legislative District, Position 1AdvertisementThis is placeholder text A 34-year-old is among latest victims of COVID-19 in Clark CountyPosted by Chris BrownDate: Friday, July 10, 2020in: Newsshare 0 last_img read more

New center to collaborate with international coalition to advance synthesis in archaeology

first_imgPublished: Sept. 29, 2020 The University of Colorado Boulder and the SRI Foundation will jointly establish a Center for Collaborative Synthesis in Archaeology (CCSA) to advance “scientific understandings of the human past and solutions to contemporary social challenges.”The new center will work with the SRI Foundation’s Coalition for Archaeological Synthesis (CfAS), an international coalition of organizational partners and individual associates, to expand knowledge of the past to shape a more secure and just future.According to CfAS co-Presidents Jeff Altschul and Keith Kintigh, the center “marks a milestone in moving archaeology beyond answering the who, what, when and where of the past to addressing the how and why of social dynamics in ways that are relevant to the present. Our common goal is nothing short of meeting the daunting societal challenges we face with solutions informed by the past that benefit people from all walks of life, everywhere on the planet.”CCSA will be housed in CU Boulder’s Institute of Behavioral Science (IBS), an interdisciplinary research institute with a research and training mission dedicated to advancing knowledge and pursuing solutions to societal challenges. “From its beginning more than sixty years ago, IBS has stood at the forefront of interdisciplinary efforts to bring basic research to bear on the real social problems of the contemporary world,” said IBS Director Myron Gutmann. “CCSA is the latest in a long line of outstanding initiatives in that direction. I applaud the new ideas it brings and look forward to working with CfAS to ensure its success.”Both CfAS and CCSA were conceptualized at a workshop at the School for Advanced Research in February 2017. CfAS, which currently has 47 Partners and more than 300 Associates spread across the globe, was established in late 2017. To date, CfAS has sponsored collaborative synthetic projects on fire management and the interactions of human food webs and biodiversity, as well as a design workshop on human migration. CfAS continues to support collaborative research emerging from the migration workshop and has also begun an initiative on social inequality. In addition to administering CfAS projects and initiatives, CCSA will provide leadership and logistical support for collaborative archaeological research. To learn more about CfAS, its current initiatives, and how you can participate in the Coalition, visit www.archsynth.org.Scott Ortman, associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at CU Boulder, will serve as the inaugural director of the CCSA. Upon formalizing the agreement, Ortman released the following statement:  “I am delighted to help establish the center as a partner organization to CfAS, and as an international hub that will expand the relevance of archaeological research for contemporary issues. I am deeply grateful to the Coalition for Archaeological Synthesis, the University of Colorado Boulder, the Institute of Behavioral Science, and the Department of Anthropology for their support of this endeavor.”last_img read more

Jamaica Benefiting From PetroCaribe Agreement

first_imgJamaica Benefiting From PetroCaribe Agreement EnergySeptember 14, 2010 RelatedJamaica Benefiting From PetroCaribe Agreement Story HighlightsA total of US$1.2 billion in concessional financing has been provided to Jamaica in the form of long-term loans, based on oil purchases from Venezuela under the PetroCaribe Energy Co-operation Agreement.The multifaceted arrangement, which commenced in 2005, seeks to promote energy security in the region, by guaranteeing supplies of petroleum products from Venezuela through an innovative repayment system, which allows for payments to be made over 23 years, and using goods and services.Member countries are allowed to retain part of their payment in the form of a low interest loan. A total of US$1.2 billion in concessional financing has been provided to Jamaica in the form of long-term loans, based on oil purchases from Venezuela under the PetroCaribe Energy Co-operation Agreement.The multifaceted arrangement, which commenced in 2005, seeks to promote energy security in the region, by guaranteeing supplies of petroleum products from Venezuela through an innovative repayment system, which allows for payments to be made over 23 years, and using goods and services.Member countries are allowed to retain part of their payment in the form of a low interest loan.Manager of the PetroCaribe Development Fund, which was established to manage the proceeds from the arrangement, Sharon Weber, tells JIS News that five years on, Jamaica has benefitted significantly and will continue to make maximum use of the benefits available to support its economic and social stability.“The financial resources received so far have been invested primarily in improving the country’s physical infrastructure (including mining infrastructure), financing the productive sector (through public sector development financing institutions), investing in renewable energy resources (wind energy, including the Wigton Wind Farm project in Manchester) and to support the operations of certain public entities which provide critical services to the economy,” she informs.Specific projects include the expansion and upgrade of the country’s road network (Marcus Garvey Drive); upgrading of the Norman Manley International Airport; and expansion of the port infrastructure.Resources have also been allocated for the refinancing of domestic public sector debt, which a significant factor in preventing job losses and keeping key entities afloat; to support the public transportation system including the Jamaican Urban Transit Company (JUTC) and projects designed to stimulate economic expansion as in the case of the Petrojam Refinery Upgrade Project.Within the ambit of the agreement, Venezuela purchased 49 per cent of the shares in the Petrojam Refinery in 2008, and since then has been instrumental in efforts aimed at expanding and upgrading the processing capacity at the Marcus Garvey Drive facility.The refinery upgrade will lift the capacity of the 40-year-old facility from 35,000 barrels to 50,000 barrels a day and result in numerous benefits for Jamaica, including savings of approximately US$100 million in foreign exchange.Additionally, the improvement will ensure the viability of the refinery for the long-term and allow for the installation of treatment facilities to meet new environmental specifications for diesel oil and gasoline.Meanwhile, Mrs. Weber states that going forward, Jamaicans can rest assured that “financing, including resources derived from initiatives undertaken by Venezuela, such as through its joint venture activities, will continue to support the most critical development priorities within the context of achieving the objectives of Vision 2030 (National Development Plan, which aims to make ‘Jamaica, the place of choice to live, work, raise families, and do business’ by the year 2030).”On August 23, 2005 Jamaica and Venezuela signed the historic and development-driven PetroCaribe Energy Co-operation Agreement.The bilateral agreement followed the signing of a multilateral agreement between Venezuela and 13 Caribbean countries on July 29, 2005 which created the PetroCaribe Initiative. Subsequently the membership was increased, bringing the total to 18 countries.The brainchild of Venezuelan President, Hugo Chavez, the objective of the initiative is to alleviate the burden of rising oil prices and its negative impact on Caribbean countries. It seeks to contribute to their energy security, foster regional integration, and promote the social and economic development of the region.A key aim is to strengthen food security throughout the region through the creation of a special fund from oil proceeds when prices exceed US$100 per barrel. The fund will support member countries in expanding agriculture.Even with the numerous benefits from the undertaking, there have been concerns with respect to debt servicing that could result in modifications being made to the arrangement.“Given concerns about the indebtedness of beneficiaries, Venezuela is exploring other mechanisms to manage the financed portion of the oil bill. It is understood that discussions are taking place internally on a proposed mechanism, which will be presented in due course to beneficiaries,” Mrs. Weber explains.Mrs. Weber however assures that Jamaica has been servicing its debt on time in accordance with the arrangement.“We commenced debt servicing to Venezuela in 2008 and have made provision to continue to meet Jamaica’s obligations under the agreement as they fall due,” she says. RelatedJamaica Benefiting From PetroCaribe Agreementcenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedJamaica Benefiting From PetroCaribe Agreement Advertisementslast_img read more

$1 Billion Grant for JEEP, SLB and Social Housing

first_imgAdvertisements RelatedPrime Minister Golding Announces Cabinet Changes $1 Billion Grant for JEEP, SLB and Social Housing ParliamentMay 28, 2012 Related$1 Billion Grant for JEEP, SLB and Social Housing The Jamaica Emergency Employment Programme (JEEP) is one of three main areas, which will benefit from a $1 billion grant from the PetroCaribe Fund during the 2012/13 fiscal year. The others are the Students Loan Bureau (SLB) and social housing programmes, Finance and Planning Minister, Hon. Dr. Peter Phillips, disclosed on May 24, while opening the 2012/13 budget debate in the House of Representatives.  In his speech, entitled: ‘A New and Binding Covenant for Stability, Equitable Growth and Prosperity,’ Dr. Phillips said the additional funding for JEEP would not only provide assistance to those, who are in need of a job, but also help to boost the macroeconomic environment. He advised that Prime Minister, the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller, will outline details of the provisions to the social housing programmes, among other areas, during her contribution to the debate. “So, this is part of our commitment (to the nation), over all. We are not simply about fiscal consolidation. We intend to not only protect the marginalised, but to create the impetus for growth, as well,” he stated. By Douglas McIntosh, JIS Reporter Related$1 Billion Grant for JEEP, SLB and Social Housinglast_img read more

Education Code In Need Of Upgrading

first_imgRelatedEducation Code In Need Of Upgrading Story HighlightsEducation Minister, Rev. the Hon. Ronald Thwaites, has hinted at a possible review of the provisions of Jamaica’s Education Code of Regulations, commencing next year.The code outlines a series of procedures, which must be followed for disciplinary procedures, addressing issues such as natural justice, and the right of representation and appeal, for the process to be completed.Speaking at the JTA’s Roll of Honour Award Ceremony at the Wyndham Kingston Hotel on Thursday (November 8), Rev. Thwaites, in noting that the Code has long been the “guiding principle” of the relationship between administrations and teachers, said it “obviously is in need of reform and upgrading in order to protect all and to provide accountability”. RelatedEducation Code In Need Of Upgrading RelatedEducation Code In Need Of Upgrading FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail center_img Education Code In Need Of Upgrading EducationNovember 10, 2012 Education Minister, Rev. the Hon. Ronald Thwaites, has hinted at a possible review of the provisions of Jamaica’s Education Code of Regulations, commencing next year.The code outlines a series of procedures, which must be followed for disciplinary procedures, addressing issues such as natural justice, and the right of representation and appeal, for the process to be completed.Speaking at the JTA’s Roll of Honour Award Ceremony at the Wyndham Kingston Hotel on Thursday (November 8), Rev. Thwaites, in noting that the Code has long been the “guiding principle” of the relationship between administrations and teachers, said it “obviously is in need of reform and upgrading in order to protect all and to provide accountability”.“Security of tenure is to be matched with accountability in any profession. This is a simple principle of efficiency that applies anywhere, and we must make sure that it is also applied in this most noble and this most responsible profession (of teaching),” he argued.Rev. Thwaites also cited the need for more specialist teachers within the education system, particularly at the early childhood level. He lamented the emerging prospect of a number of graduating student teachers, who may not be able to secure employment immediately or any at all, for varying reasons.“We need those teachers in the profession. Less than 20 per cent of early childhood institutions have trained teachers. We (also) need a good special education teacher in most of our schools. Primary schools with (student populations of) 2000… are too large…and there has to be a realignment of the skills of our teachers to serve where they are needed and not necessarily where they have been originally tenured,” he contended.In this regard, the Minister of Education emphasized the need for education to be regarded as the number one priority area of investment in Jamaica by interests at all levels of the society.He said that there is need to improve outcomes at all levels of the system, citing the less that acceptable passes in national and external examinations.  He said that only about half of those emerging from early childhood institutions can pass the readiness test for Grade One, with no more than 50-odd per cent achieving mastery at Grade 4 and significantly less than that, in numeracy.“We all know the results of the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) and for the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) examinations…then you will realize the imperative for change, for innovativeness,” he stated.In light of this, Rev. Thwaites said stakeholders in education must lead the sector’s transformation, and urged the JTA to take up the mantle in this regard.“Ministers of Education come and go; and, therefore, all we in the political directorate can do is to give guidance on policy on behalf of those who we represent. But it is those who have given their lives and pledged their careers (to education)…it is to you that we must turn…for the new era to emerge.“It is this pilgrimage of good purpose that will lead us to the achievement of our (Vision) 2030 (National Development Plan) goals and towards the strong, alert, cognitively adept, socially appropriate, spiritually conscious nation that we all yearn after,” Rev. Thwaites contended.Retired Principal of the Mandeville Primary and Junior High School in Manchester, Byron Farquharson, was this year’s 43rd inductee into the JTA’s Honour Roll.  He was presented with the Berger Paints-sponsored Roll of Honour Award by the company’s Regional Managing Director for the Caribbean, Warren McDonald, and a special Citation, by JTA President, Clayton Hall. Advertisementslast_img read more

UDC Pursuing Private Sector Partnership for Projects

first_imgRelatedSandals Foundation Donates Equipment to St. Ann’s Bay Hospital The Urban Development Corporation (UDC) is seeking private sector partnerships to take on a number of investment projects.Speaking at a recent JIS Think Tank, General Manager of the UDC, Desmond Malcolm, said the projects include Long Bay Beach 1 and 2 in Negril, Westmoreland; and the northern car park in downtown Kingston.He also cited the Catherine Hall Entertainment Centre in St. James; Caymanas Golf and Country Club and Cotton Polyester Complex in St. Catherine; the Ideal Warehouse and Festival Marketplace, in downtown Kingston; as well as a number of hotel rooms in Montego Bay and Negril.In the case of the downtown Kingston car park, Mr. Malcolm said the UDC had issued a Request for Proposal last month, but based on the response, will be returning to the market with a more attractive offer.“We intend to establish a car park in downtown Kingston because we believe that parking is very critical to the revitalization of Downtown Kingston,” Mr. Malcolm said.He further noted that the UDC has identified a number of “shovel ready projects.” These are projects that would have gone through the critical approval phases and are ready for development by investors.Mr. Malcolm informed that so far eight such projects have been identified and that this concept is a major step in the corporation’s efforts to facilitate development across the island.“We understand that a lot of time developers, particularly those overseas, prefer not to have to go through the various agencies for the various permits,” Mr. Malcolm explained. He said these projects have approved development plans, and the UDC is collaborating with JAMPRO to market the projects.The UDC General Manager said the agency continues to develop several projects across the island, such as the Jubilee Market in downtown Kingston; the Linstead Market, which has been designated a Jamaica 50 legacy project; the Harbour Street Craft market in Montego Bay; the Sabina Park lighting project; and the Spanish Town historic trail. Photo: JIS PhotographerGeneral Manager of the UDC, Desmond Malcolm addresses a JIS Think Tank session on Thursday, June 12. RelatedWolmer’s Student Cops NRSC Poster Competition Again RelatedPM Praises Nation’s Teachers FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail center_img UDC Pursuing Private Sector Partnership for ProjectsJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Story HighlightsThe Urban Development Corporation (UDC) is seeking private sector partnerships to take on a number of investment projects.Speaking at a recent JIS Think Tank, General Manager of the UDC, Desmond Malcolm, said the projects include Long Bay Beach 1 and 2 in Negril, Westmoreland; and the northern car park in downtown Kingston.The UDC has identified a number of “shovel ready projects.” These are projects that would have gone through the critical approval phases and are ready for development by investors. UDC Pursuing Private Sector Partnership for Projects Office of the Prime MinisterJune 17, 2014Written by: Oroyo Eubanks Advertisementslast_img read more

Santa Monica’s Social Services Commission supports ‘ban the box’

first_imgHomeNewsGovernmentSanta Monica’s Social Services Commission supports ‘ban the box’ Jan. 27, 2016 at 7:59 amGovernmentSanta Monica’s Social Services Commission supports ‘ban the box’Jennifer Maas5 years agoban the boxcity councilconvicted of a crimeconvictionsfair chance ordinanceNewsSanta Monicasanta monica newssocial services commission At a Jan. 25 meeting, the Social Services Commission unanimously voted to support the Fair Chance Ordinance, a policy that would prevent employers from asking job applicants about his or her criminal history – or running a background check – until the applicant has been given a conditional offer of employment.A “ban the box” policy – a term that refers to the section on most job applications that asks, “Have you ever been convicted of a crime?” – is currently pending in the City of Los Angeles.Now there is talk of adopting a similar ordinance in the City of Santa Monica, and on Monday night a few members of the community came to present their support for the policy to the Commission.Among them was Brianna Shepard, a 20-year resident of Santa Monica and member of IKAR, a Jewish community whose members believe in acting as ethical citizens who care about social justice.“Currently, we are working with LA Voice and Homeboy Industries to lower barriers to employment for formerly incarcerated individuals in Los Angeles, through the Fair Chance Ordinance,” Shepard said to the Commission.Shepard emphasized that people of color are disproportionately arrested, convicted and incarcerated and stated that, “formerly incarcerated people, who have served their time, deserve to return to their communities, rejoin their families, earn a living, and regain their dignity.”Shepard noted that New York, Boston, Seattle and San Francisco have initiated “ban the box” ordinances.Commissioner Tania Bradkin stated that approximately 70 million Americans have criminal records and that one in 10 of those Americans are veterans.“And that’s really important I think, to recognize that,” Bradkin said. According to Bradkin, 90 percent of those incarcerated will also come back into our society. “They’re going to be released whether or not it was an incarceration or a conviction, what is of interest to me is what lies ahead for them. And everything points to the fact that incarceration does not work, you know, and a lifetime of unemployment also does not work.”During discussion, Chair of the Social Services Commission, J. Shawn Landres, said he believed there was value in a degree of consistency in the Southern California region when it came to the ordinance, similar to the issue of consistency with minimum wage.“The City Council does pay attention to what’s happening and may make some deliberate choices in distinction,” Landres said. “We do have the exemption for labor agreements in Santa Monica minimum wage that are not in the City of L.A. … One way to tweak this recommendation might be to encourage the City of Santa Monica to track what is happening in L.A. City Council and to adopt an ordinance that provides consistency in the region.”The Commission passed a motion which stated that, “Believing that people who have made mistakes deserve a second chance and the opportunity to live their lives without undue stigma, the Santa Monica Social Services Commission supports the Fair Chance ‘ban the box’ efforts to reduce barriers to employment for formerly incarcerated individuals and encourages Santa Monica City Council to develop an ordinance to prevent discrimination against formerly incarcerated and formerly convicted individuals.”Landres concluded that the ordinance is a value, as much as it is a piece of legislation.“It’s about who we are as a city,” Landres [email protected] :ban the boxcity councilconvicted of a crimeconvictionsfair chance ordinanceNewsSanta Monicasanta monica newssocial services commissionshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentDriving increases among City employeesRescue drill simulates Expo accidentYou Might Also LikeBriefsNewsBeach House Begins Community Re-Opening June 15Guest Author2 days agoBriefsNewsInput Invited for Marine Park Improvement ProjectsGuest Author2 days agoBriefsNewsPublic Health Emphasizes the Importance of Vaccinations as Distancing and Masking Guidelines Relax Next WeekGuest Author2 days agoBriefsNews“Righting Our Wrongs” performance on June 11Guest Author2 days agoBriefsNewsSEATTLE Feds plan to curtail West Coast salmon fishing to help orcasGuest Author2 days agoColumnsNewsOpinionYour Column HereYour column hereGuest Author2 days agolast_img read more

Santa Monica student named California Arts Scholar

first_imgHomeNewsEducationSanta Monica student named California Arts Scholar Jun. 15, 2016 at 6:14 amEducationSanta Monica student named California Arts ScholarJeff Goodman5 years agoaffordable housing in santa monicaanimationbruce debiasseCSSSAeducationfranklin elementary schoolLACMAlincoln middle schoolSanta Monicasanta monica californiasanta monica high schoolthe nightmare before christmastim burtonvalenciavenice beach It took Bruce DeBiasse away from his schoolwork, but that was a price he paid happily.While preparing for an exam, the Santa Monica High School sophomore-to-be learned that he had been named a California Arts Scholar.“I was very excited,” he said. “It impeded me from studying a little bit, but I was very happy.”The distinction means that DeBiasse will be attending the California State Summer School for the Arts, a prestigious program in creative disciplines for talented high school students. The four-week program at the California Institute for the Arts in Valencia helps students develop their skills in animation, music, film, theater, dance, creative writing and visual art.DeBiasse, an animation student, will tackle a rigorous curriculum as he learns traditional and experimental techniques. He’ll study the work of animators from around the globe, take part in drawing classes and learn from professionals.The group also typically takes a field trip, and past students have visited the Los Angeles Zoo, the Museum of Jurassic Technology, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and Venice Beach as well as area animation studios.Only one in three applicants to the animation program is accepted each year, according to the CSSSA website. The program begins July 9.“It is our expectation that some CSSSA graduates will become professional artists,” the program’s mission statement reads. “Others will go on to apply their creative skills in other professions. The goal of CSSSA is to provide an educational experience that goes beyond the practice and improvement of aesthetics and technique. We want to broaden our students’ understanding of their creative potentials, regardless of their eventual life paths.”DeBiasse took a liking to animation by watching movies throughout his childhood, including Tim Burton’s stop-motion masterpiece “The Nightmare Before Christmas.” When he asked parents and others how those movies were made, the answers he got often involved animation.“I decided to research it a little bit,” he said.DeBiasse then started producing his own work, doing everything from stop-motion to computer animation. The alumnus of Franklin Elementary and Lincoln Middle schools said he’s mostly self-taught, although he has attended art classes for drawing.After hearing about the CSSSA program from a cousin, DeBiasse and his mom looked into it as a potential summer opportunity. He submitted an application with drawings and other materials, including pieces he selected from portfolios he had previously compiled.He said he hopes the program makes him a more well-rounded artist.“I’m hoping to learn different mediums, have a lot more movies under my belt than I do now and learn techniques from professionals and people who know what they’re doing,” he said.DeBiasse likened stop-motion animation to directing real actors because of the vision required to position particular shots and anticipate challenges.DeBiasse did not take an art classes at Samohi as a freshman, but he submitted a portfolio to be considered for Advanced Placement art next year. He got in.Heading into the upcoming summer program, DeBiasse said he could see himself being an animator or illustrator in the future.“I’m still on the fence,” he [email protected] :affordable housing in santa monicaanimationbruce debiasseCSSSAeducationfranklin elementary schoolLACMAlincoln middle schoolSanta Monicasanta monica californiasanta monica high schoolthe nightmare before christmastim burtonvalenciavenice beachshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentLetter: Why ‘see something, say something’ mattersSanta Monica Brew Works seeks approval for tasting roomYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsDraft Housing Element released to publicBrennon Dixson2 weeks agoFeaturedNewsRent Board announces general adjustment effective SeptemberBrennon Dixson3 weeks agoFeaturedNewsCommissioners talk diversity, or a lack thereofBrennon Dixson3 weeks agoFeaturedNewsSMMUSD breaks down budget revisionsBrennon Dixson3 weeks agoFeaturedNewsVenice Beach U.S. Men’s Soccer Player Heads to Costa Rica for National TournamentGuest Author3 weeks agoFeaturedNewsCity Manager selection process beginsBrennon Dixson4 weeks agolast_img read more