Now Ford has spoken out against Donald Trump’s travel ban

whatsapp Monday 30 January 2017 5:23 pm Emma Haslett The pair added: “Respect for all people is a core value of Ford Motor Company, and we are proud of the rich diversity of our company here at home and around the world.”We will continue working to ensure the well-being of our employees by promoting the values of respect and inclusion in the workplace.”Yesterday it was reported Fields had told Trump 1m jobs could be at risk if new fuel economy standards come into effect. Fields is also on Trump’s business council, alongside Tesla chief executive Elon Musk, Dell founder Michael Dell and General Electric’s Jeff Immelt. At the beginning of this month the car maker announced it had scrapped plans to build a $1.6bn (£1.3bn) plant in Mexico, in favour of a $700m investment in Michigan.  whatsapp Share At the time, Fields insisted the company wasn’t pandering to Trump’s protectionism, instead saying it was a “vote of confidence” in Trump’s “pro-business environment”. “We didn’t cut a deal with Trump. We did it for our business,” he told CNN.Read more: Here’s how British citizens are affected by Donald Trump’s travel banOutrageTrump’s decision to ban citizens of Iraq, Iran, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from travelling to the US has caused uproar and confusion.The Foreign Office confirmed this afternoon British citizens will be able to travel to the US, even if they have dual nationality with one of the countries on the list, or carry a second passport. That was despite a (now removed) notice from the US embassy which advised people not to apply for visas or travel to the US. The two top executives at the US’ largest carmaker have waded into the row over Donald Trump’s decision to ban citizens of seven Middle Eastern and North African countries from travelling to the US, saying it “goes against our values as a company”.Reuters reported Ford’s executive chairman Bill Ford Jr and chief exec Mark Fields told employees the company does not support the ban.  Ad Unmute by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeAtlantic MirrorA Kilimanjaro Discovery Has Proved This About The BibleAtlantic MirrorUndoUnify Health LabsRandy Jackson: This 3 Minute Routine Transformed My HealthUnify Health LabsUndoMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryUndoLiver Health1 Bite of This Melts Belly And Arm Fat (Take Before Bed)Liver HealthUndoFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatterUndoLuxury SUVs | Search AdsThese Cars Are So Loaded It’s Hard to Believe They’re So CheapLuxury SUVs | Search AdsUndoSportPirateMeet The Woman Catherine Bell Is Dating At 52SportPirateUndoTaco RelishSuspicious Pics That Are Fishier Than The SeaTaco RelishUndoNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyUndo Meanwhile, US banking giants have rallied behind staff, with the bosses of Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan and Morgan Stanley pledging commitment to their employees. Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive of Goldman Sachs, said the move was “not a policy we support”.  Now Ford has spoken out against Donald Trump’s travel ban read more

Audit finds problems after state denies access to oil tax records

first_imgEconomy | Energy & Mining | Politics | State GovernmentAudit finds problems after state denies access to oil tax recordsApril 14, 2020 by Andrew Kitchenman, KTOO and Alaska Public Media Share:Rep. Chris Tuck, D-Anchorage, discusses discusses a bill during a committee hearing in the Capitol in Juneau last year. This week, Tuck expressed concern about a recent audit of state spending. (Photo by Skip Gray/KTOO)Kris Curtis works for the state’s Division of Legislative Audit. Last year, she had a routine task — an audit of state spending that has to be done every year.But she said she ran into several problems when she was conducting the audit: The state denied her and her team access to financial records for oil and gas taxes, and the former revenue commissioner wouldn’t sign off on the accuracy of department records.Also, the audit showed the state owes $1.6 billion more to the Constitutional Budget Reserve.At the conclusion of the audit, Curtis wrote a “qualified opinion” — which means she can’t assure that all of the state’s financial records for last year are accurate.Access deniedThe federal government requires that the audit be done every year for the state to receive federal funding. And state law requires that the auditor have access to any information that’s relevant to the audit.Curtis said this is the first time a department has decided to deny auditors access to records in the 28 years she’s worked for the Division of Legislative Audit.The state’s Department of Law said in an emailed statement that the oil tax records the auditors needed are protected by attorney-client privilege. It said the state position has been consistent since former Gov. Bill Walker’s administration.“We are disappointed that the Legislative Auditor has decided to cast aspersions on the Department of Law,” according to the statement.Curtis and her team were trying to understand how oil companies reduced their tax payments to the state using tax credits. She said they were also trying to determine whether the companies’ settlements with the state circumvented the Alaska Legislature’s authority to appropriate the tax credits.But the state refused auditors access to all of the documents they requested.A $1.6 billion discrepancyThe audit also reflects a disagreement between the Legislature and Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s administration over whether oil tax settlement money should be deposited into the Constitutional Budget Reserve, a savings account the state has used to balance the budget.This has been going on for years. Starting with Walker’s administration, lawyers for the state have maintained that these settlements should be deposited into the general fund, which is the main account the state uses to fund the budget.As a result of this difference, the Department of Law has said that the state owes the CBR $1.6 billion less than the audit and lawyers for the Legislature said.What’s “qualified”State Rep. Chris Tuck, an Anchorage Democrat, chairs the Legislative Budget and Audit Committee, which reviews the audit every year. Tuck said he’s concerned that having a qualified opinion from the auditor will decrease lenders’ and the public’s trust in the state and hurt the state’s bond rating.“We really need to get our auditors in there, to know what’s happening, to know that the transfers are happening properly and that the money is being deposited properly, and that taxes are according to statutes — that they’re following the law,” he said.Tuck said he would like to hold a committee hearing on the audit as soon as possible. He hopes the committee can have a dialogue with the Department of Revenue and the Department of Law to understand their position.If auditors don’t receive access to records they’re requesting, Tuck said the committee could subpoena the records. He emphasized that the subpoena would be aimed at giving the auditors access, not the committee.“We don’t want to make this political,” Tuck said. “The auditor is a separate division. It’s constitutionally protected. We want to make sure that everything’s clean, smooth, without bias, without partisanship, and that we can make corrective action, and that the public knows that we’re doing everything right.”In an email to Curtis, former acting Revenue Commissioner Mike Barnhill (now the deputy commissioner) asked to discuss with her the safeguards her office will have to preserve confidentiality of the tax records, including from legislators.Both Curtis and Tuck said that the auditors wouldn’t share confidential records with lawmakers. They emphasized that there’s a firewall between the auditors and lawmakers, including maintaining separate computer systems.Share this story:last_img read more

At a hospice facility for children, a long goodbye is made a little less lonely

first_img Please enter a valid email address. For loved ones, scattering of ashes becomes a healing journey As the end nears, ‘death doulas’ ease the way EndnotesAt a hospice facility for children, a long goodbye is made a little less lonely Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. By Bob Tedeschi May 4, 2016 Reprints Inside the home, the boy labored and the rest of the family passed the time not knowing how to be.Berger can’t remember for sure when the grandfather reappeared, other than it was afternoon. It would have taken him multiple trips to carry that much food to the grills. Ribs, chops, chicken, pork, beef — in amounts far beyond what the family could possibly eat.The older man lit the fire and the family sprung to action, prepping food, clearing space, doing their jobs. The smell of barbecue filled the place, filled the boy’s room, as did the sounds of a family mobilized.When the meal was cooked the family delivered plates to every staff member and thanked them for their support through it all. People lingered late into the evening, chatting with staff, wrapping leftovers.Berger left, the grandfather left. Only a small few staffers remained.Those few were still there hours later when, in a darkened room with a moonlit view of two smoldering barbecue grills, a young boy took his leave. Armella Leung for STAT Leave this field empty if you’re human: When the boy with the big family lay dying, the place was quieter, pensive.It was a Saturday morning when Berger spotted the grandfather walking alone, as usual. Berger caught up to him, used the only thing he had.“I heard you’re good with a grill,” he said.The man said he wasn’t bad.We’ve got two big ones out back, he told him, nodding in the direction of the two dark hulks. Anyone can use them, he said.It wasn’t much of a conversation. The older man smiled quietly and walked on. Berger returned to work.center_img Related: This happens with younger people, hospice workers say. A disease can ravage their body, but their heart and other organs are often so strong that they’ll continue after most everything else has shut down, leaving survivors to an agonizingly long and lonely goodbye.This boy had had an aggressive form of cancer for months, and now he lay in what had become his de facto bedroom, in a facility that was largely given over to his enormous extended family because no one in the clan owned a home big enough to hold them all.Dr. Kevin Berger works at Ryan House. He’s been involved with pediatric palliative care for 19 years now, and has been at Ryan House for six years. He knew the look of someone who was lost.Berger asked someone on staff about the grandfather, looking for some way to reach him. The older man was a bit of a maestro at the barbecue grill, someone told Berger. He was known far and wide for it. It was a start, Berger thought.Berger believes Ryan House needs to comprehensively support families, and focus on interventions that help achieve their goals.As often as not, that means music, play, celebrations, sleepovers with friends in the community room.“These are meaningful, mindful interventions, as opposed to the traditional medical focus,” Berger said. “You can take a really sad time and make it into something where the family will remember an incredible event before the child’s death, and that’s the focus.” He was two generations removed from the boy in the bed, a weary young grandchild who had not fully awakened in days, and who in truth would not wake again.He would linger, silently, anywhere but the bedside — his oversize, calloused hands stuffed in the front pockets of his jeans. Then, unmoored, he would drift away, down the hall, outside, anywhere else.This all took place in Phoenix at a place called Ryan House, which is one of two freestanding inpatient pediatric hospice and respite facilities in the United States. The country might not need many facilities like this, but palliative care specialists say the country needs a lot more than two.advertisement Related: Privacy Policy Anyway. The man.He was the patriarch of this huge family that buzzed around the facility every day the boy was there. The staff knew the grandfather as a man of few words, and they also sensed how seriously he took his role as leader and protector. And now here he stood, powerless to help anyone, not least the boy who was struggling to die.advertisement Tags end of lifehospicepediatricslast_img read more

Raise a glass to Aussie wine this Christmas

first_imgRaise a glass to Aussie wine this Christmas The Hon David Littleproud MPMinister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency ManagementMinister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management, David Littleproud is encouraging wine lovers to look closer to home and choose to buy Australian wine this holiday season.Minister Littleproud said Aussie vineyards and winemakers have had a tough year with smoke taint from the bushfires, lack of tourists because of COVID-19 and trade tensions, so they need our support more than ever this holiday season.“A vibrant wine industry is vital for supporting our rural and regional economies,” Minister Littleproud said.“We grow the grapes, pick the grapes, crush the grapes, blend and bottle the wine right here.“It is a perfect example of a thriving Australian industry.“We are the 6th largest wine producer in the world, and the 5th largest wine exporter, with two thirds of Australian wine exported adding $2.84 billion to the economy in 2019-20.“Australian wine is a great addition to the dinner table year-round, but especially at Christmas. It also makes a perfect gift to be enjoyed by friends and family.“Every bottle of Australian wine sold makes a world of difference to producers feeling the pinch this year.“I encourage wine drinkers to drink responsibly and enjoy the best wine in the world this Christmas.“Cheers to Aussie wine and have a safe and happy festive season.”If you’re a wine lover, post a photo of you enjoying a great Australian wine with food, family and friends, using the hashtag #chooseaustralianwine.Fast FactsAustralians drank around 19L of wine per person in 2018-19.The gross value of Australian wine grape production was $913 million in 2019-20Australian wine exports totalled $2.9 billion in 2019-20, mainly to China, the United Kingdom, the United States and CanadaThere were nearly 4000 vineyards across Australia in 2018-19 /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, Australia, Australian, Australian industry, bushfires, Canada, China, covid-19, Economy, Emergency, Government, Holiday, industry, Minister, production, United Kingdom, United Stateslast_img read more

From Hate Speech to Genocide, Lessons from 1994 Genocide against Tutsi in Rwanda

first_imgFrom Hate Speech to Genocide, Lessons from 1994 Genocide against Tutsi in Rwanda On the International Day of Reflection on the Genocide in Rwanda, 7 April, UNESCO will hold an online panel discussion from 15:00 to 16:30 CEST, which can be viewed here.It was on 7 April 1994 that the Hutu extremist-led government in Rwanda launched a systematic attack that within 100 days killed more than 1 million members of the Tutsi minority. The day is both a time to honor the victims and survivors, and to extract from this senseless slaughter the lessons that can still be learned to prevent genocide in the future.The online event will begin with introductory remarks from UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay and Ambassador François Xavier Ngarambe, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Rwanda to UNESCO, to be followed by a conversation between Mr. Freddy Mutanguha, a survivor of the Genocide, and Dr. Tali Nates, Director of the Johannesburg Holocaust and Genocide Centre.Participants in the panel discussion are:Ms. Susan Benesch (USA), Director of the Dangerous Speech project,Mr. Marcel Kabanda (France), Historian and former President of Ibuka France,Mr. Paul Rutayisire (Rwanda), Historian.Ambassador Silvia Fernandez de Gurmendi (Argentina), Chair of Global Action Against Mass Atrocity Crimes and former President of the International Criminal Court, will deliver a video message.Closing remarks will be delivered by Ms. Alice Wairimu Nderitu, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide. Dr. Stephen Smith, UNESCO Chair on Genocide Education and Executive Director of the University of Southern California Shoah Foundation, will moderate the event.Hate speech and hate propaganda were identified as catalysts of the genocidal violence in Rwanda. The United Nations Strategy and Plan of Action on Hate Speech (2019) seeks to strengthen the UN response to the global phenomenon of hate speech and placing specific emphasis on the role of education as a tool for addressing and countering hate speech, while at the same time upholding legitimate freedom of expression and access to information.The commemoration is being organized by UNESCO and the University of Southern California Shoah Foundation UNESCO Chair on Genocide Education, with the Permanent Delegation of Rwanda to UNESCO, in partnership with Global Action Against Mass Atrocity Crimes (GAAMAC).As the only UN agency with a mandate to promote the prevention of genocide through education, UNESCO is committed to promoting genocide remembrance and education to sensitize learners about the causes, dynamics and consequences of such crimes and to strengthen their resilience against all forms of discrimination. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Ambassador, california, education, France, Government, participants, President, prevention, resilience, Rwanda, southern, UN, Unesco, United Nations, university, University of Southern Californialast_img read more

Businesses keen to plug into charging network

first_imgBusinesses keen to plug into charging network Leading supermarkets, motels, holiday parks and petrol stations are among more than 600 sites that have registered to host electric vehicle charging stations as part of the Marshall Government’s $13.4m commitment to support a statewide Electric Vehicle Fast Charging Network.Minister for Energy and Mining Dan van Holst Pellekaan said the Marshall Government’s $13.4 million investment aims to end “range anxiety” with the installation of 530 fast charging stations across the state.“Following consultation, we’re now able to extend the network further across regional and remote South Australia, including getting more charging stations in key tourist areas in the Adelaide Hills, Mid North, Far North, Eyre Peninsula and Limestone Coast,” said Minister Dan van Holst Pellekaan.“Electric vehicles will lower motoring costs, air, noise and carbon pollution and help reduce the price of electricity for all South Australians by better using the grid.“Fast charging, particularly in regional and remote areas, will remove a big barrier to electric vehicles – fear of running out of power, or range anxiety.“The Marshall Government’s aim is for electric cars to be the preferred choice for households and businesses by 2030, and the default choice by 2035.“We want to make sure motorists know they can buy an electric car, and still enjoy the pleasure of travelling our highways and byways without fear of being stranded.“As South Australians increasingly turn to electric vehicles, we will increase the use of renewable energy generated here to power our vehicles whilst reducing our reliance on imported oil.“The installation of 120 fast chargers in the CBD and many more throughout the suburbs will support the needs of Adelaide’s motorists.“The South Australian Governments is already incorporating 70 plug in vehicles into its fleet with additional orders soon to be made as part of the new procurement policy which will see the whole fleet transition in coming years.”Transport in South Australia contributes to 30 per cent of our total greenhouse gas emissions.This shift to electric vehicles will lower transport costs, cut emissions and reduce pollution, bringing forward public health, environmental and economic benefits.RAA Mobility Technology Specialist Mark Borlace said member surveys had shown a lack of regional electric vehicle chargers was a significant disincentive to buying an electric vehicle.“The roll out of electric vehicle charging stations, as advocated by RAA, is welcomed and will increase the uptake of these environmentally friendlier technologies,” he said.“RAA supports the government’s desire to lead the nation in the uptake of electric vehicles and smart charging by 2025 and reduce electricity costs for all South Australians.”Guidelines on how charge point operators can access funding and connect with potential site hosts will be made available next week.Property owners and businesses can still register their interest to become site hosts through the Department for Energy and Mining’s website – electricvehicles.sa.gov.au /Public News. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Adelaide, Adelaide Hills, AusPol, Australia, Australian, Australian Government, electric car, electric vehicle, electricity, Government, greenhouse gas emissions, Limestone, limestone coast, public health, renewable energy, SA Government, South Australia, technologylast_img read more

Paso Robles Wine Region’s Allegretto Vineyard Resort Creates World’s First Sonic…

first_imgReddIt Previous articleFountaingrove Day III: Vintage ResilienceNext articleThe 2018 San Luis Obispo County Wine Industry Awards Recognize Leaders of the Industry at the California Mid-State Fair Press Release Email TAGSAllegretto Vineyard ResortConsumer Twitter Facebook Home Industry News Releases Paso Robles Wine Region’s Allegretto Vineyard Resort Creates World’s First Sonic LabyrinthIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessPaso Robles Wine Region’s Allegretto Vineyard Resort Creates World’s First Sonic LabyrinthBy Press Release – July 12, 2018 621 0 AdvertisementNew Outdoor Sound Circle Complements Luxury Resort’s Wellness Offerings Nestled Amongst 20 acres of Vines and Olive Trees on California’s Central CoastJuly 12, 2018 (Paso Robles, Calif.) – The Allegretto Vineyard Resort, a 171-room luxury resort in the Paso Robles wine region, announces the creation of the world’s first Sonic Labyrinth ‘Sound Circle.’ Designed to provide guests a tranquil space with a distinctive series of sounds created by wind instruments, the new Sonic Labyrinth deepens the resort’s wellness offerings in the heart of Paso Robles Wine Country on California’s Central Coast.According to proprietor Doug Ayres, the Sonic Labyrinth utilizes music and space as a way to compel guests to slow their pace and become more mindful. As a symbol of life’s journey, a labyrinth is an archetypal pattern that leads one along a single, meandering path to a center point – the center being a metaphor as well as a physical spot. Labyrinths provide an opportunity to free the mind at one’s own pace, by incorporating sound into the experience.Activated by motion sensors, the Sound Circle creates a series of soft, soothing tones that evolve as one walks through the labyrinth, cultivating a sense of relaxation and focus, while an intentional central null space creates an added sense of grounding.Guests will hear the unique sounds of vessel flutes known as The Innate; these original handcrafted wind instruments made from European clay, have three chambers that impart an unusual harmony. “The idea is not to have a musical melody exactly, but to have different notes of harmonic sound to help evoke various emotions, ultimately creating a calming state of mind through this transformative experience,” said Ayres.Designed to broaden the resort’s wellness amenities, the award-winning hotel also offers a European-inspired spa, Chära wellness program, individually selected and purposefully positioned art collection by Ayres throughout the resort, peaceful garden walkways and French-inspired Abbey. The custom-designed Sound Circle exemplifies another way Allegretto seeks to foster a serene, contemplative environment for its guests.“Just like the musical term ‘allegretto’ describes a cheerful tempo, the Allegretto Vineyard Resort is meant to express a life lived joyfully and in harmony,” explains Ayres. “We’re pleased that this new Sound Circle in our labyrinth will add to the resort’s harmonious experience in an entirely new way, taking guests on a path of personal discovery.”ABOUT THE ALLEGRETTO VINEYARD RESORTThe Allegretto Vineyard Resort offers guests exceptional spaces, experiences, services and amenities along the path of life’s journey. The Allegretto is inspired by wine country and European hospitality, set amongst 20 acres of vineyards and fruit-bearing orchards on Paso Robles’ serene east side. The resort is a world unto itself with 171 guest rooms and suites, locally farmed and foraged cuisine at Cello Ristorante & Bar, a tasting room featuring the resort’s own private wine label, ballroom, intimate meeting spaces, over 40,000 square feet of event space, full-service boutique spa, pool and cabanas, manicured gardens, walking paths, 12,000-square-foot piazza, French-inspired Abbey, curated art and artifacts along with inspired vignettes that evoke that luxury, warmth, and the beauty of the good life. The Allegretto Vineyard Resort is located at 2700 Buena Vista Drive in Paso Robles, California, 93446. For more information, please visit AllegrettoResort.com, or call 805.369.2500.Advertisement Pinterest Linkedin Sharelast_img read more

Asian Footwears steps into fight against COVID-19

first_img The masks are priced economically for Indian masses, are reusableAsian Footwears, has stepped into the fight against COVID-19. The company announced the launch of its six-layered reusable protective face masks under the Asian HyperProtect A95 collection. These masks are made from tested and certified materials, delivering high filtration efficiencies, while being stylish at the same time. The move came right after the government announced Unlock 2.0 in which people are stepping out and slowly accepting the new normal.Asian is a brand endorsed by famous former Indian Cricketer Virender Sehwag. The Asian masks are priced economically for the Indian masses and are reusable. One mask can be washed gently under running water and be reused for up to 30 times. The masks are SITRA certified and are priced at Rs 149/- MRP (available at a discount currently on leading e-commerce platforms), hence effective cost per use comes down to Rs 5 /use. The masks have 100 per cent spandex based soft ear loops making it easy for the user to wear one for a long period of time. The masks have a six layer filter and are designed for every face type with innovative two-panel design, and come equipped with an adjustable nose pin which helps in giving the mask a perfect fitting.The mask contains two outer layers and a 4-layer filtration cartridge made using an SMMS filter fabric (spun-bonded, melt blown, melt blown and spun-bonded non-woven layers sandwiched together). The masks protect the user against any flu and other airborne germs. The organisation urges people to wear masks whenever they step out of their homes. Apart from the simple variant, the firm has also launched a second variant called HyperProtect Ultra (priced at Rs 199/- MRP). This variant comes with a filter valve respirator which helps in easy breathing and avoids heat build-up due to prolonged usage of the mask. Both models are available in more than seven different colours and prints. Also, they are available in three sizes-small, medium, and large.“As it has become mandatory for us to accept the new normal, and step out, we are making sure you remain safe. We are adding technologically advanced face masks to our range of products. The masks are 6-layered and offer you protection from dust, any airborne disease, and resistance to splashes. We need to make sure we are doing our best to control COVID-19, and this is our way of saying we care. We urge the public to use masks being manufactured in India, as we totally support the idea of Atmanirbhar India”, said Rajinder Jindal, Chairman, Asian Footwear. “We have been constantly innovating on our protective gear range – soon after the first Asian mask, we launched the Ultra version. A team of engineers and designers are leading the development of our third yet-to-be-launched PRO mask, which will be one of the most advanced masks in the reusable mask segment,” said Aayush Jindal, MD, Asian Footwears.The Asian masks are available at all leading E-commerce and retail stores in various colours and prints. Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” Add Comment WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals News Read Article Share Asian Footwears steps into fight against COVID-19 Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025 Asian FootwearsAsian HyperProtect A95Atmanirbhar IndiaCOVID-19HyperProtect UltramasksSITRA certifiedSMMS filter fabric Heartfulness group of organisations launches ‘Healthcare by Heartfulness’ COVID care app Related Posts Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha By EH News Bureau on July 16, 2020 The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Comments (0) MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre”last_img read more

House Where Garvey Grew Up To Be Transformed Into Heritage Site

first_imgRelatedIndependence Day Message from Prime Minister the Most Hon. Portia Simpson Miller Story HighlightsThe house where National Hero, the Rt. Excellent Marcus Garvey, grew up in St. Ann’s Bay, St. Ann, will be refurbished and transformed into a heritage site.This was outlined in a message from Youth and Culture Minister, Hon. Lisa Hanna, during a ceremony to commemorate the 128th birthday of Jamaica’s first National Hero, held on the compound of the St. Ann Parish Library, in St. Ann’s Bay, on Monday, August 17.The message noted that the property on which the house is located, was declared a protected site in 1992, as the Government moved to ensure that the legacy and history of Marcus Garvey was preserved. House Where Garvey Grew Up To Be Transformed Into Heritage SiteJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay RelatedCulture Minister Applauds Participants in Grand Gala House Where Garvey Grew Up To Be Transformed Into Heritage Site CultureAugust 18, 2015Written by: Marlon Tingling The house where National Hero, the Rt. Excellent Marcus Garvey, grew up in St. Ann’s Bay, St. Ann, will be refurbished and transformed into a heritage site.This was outlined in a message from Youth and Culture Minister, Hon. Lisa Hanna, during a ceremony to commemorate the 128th birthday of Jamaica’s first National Hero, held on the compound of the St. Ann Parish Library, in St. Ann’s Bay, on Monday, August 17.Read by Councillor for the Beecher Town Division of the St. Ann Parish Council, Ian Bell, the message noted that the property on which the house is located, was declared a protected site in 1992, as the Government moved to ensure that the legacy and history of Marcus Garvey was preserved.“The Ministry of Youth and Culture remains committed to preserving the legacy of this outstanding Jamaican as we are ready to start plans to refurbish the house of Jamaica’s first National Hero and transforming it into a heritage site,” Miss Hanna said.“We want to create an environment where Jamaicans at home and abroad can visit and pay tribute to a man who left a great legacy. It was he who said that ‘a people without knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots’. Let us continue to embrace our rich cultural heritage and pass on the memories and traditions to the next generation,” she added.Miss Hanna said the celebration of Marcus Garvey’s 128th  birthday and the 51st year of being named a National Hero present an opportunity  for the sharing of  cultural heritage among the youth.“Culture is a critical component of who we are as a nation,” the Minister emphasized.Also in attendance at the ceremony were Member of Parliament for North East St. Ann, Mrs. Shahine Robinson; Custos of St. Ann, Hon. Norma Walters and Mayor of St. Ann’s Bay, Councillor Desmond Gilmore.center_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedIndependence Day Message from the Governor-General His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen Photo: Marlon TinglingStatue of National Hero, the Rt. Excellent Marcus Garvey, in the courtyard of the St. Ann Parish Library, in St. Ann’s Bay. A ceremony was held at the site on August 17 to commemorate the 128th anniversary of his birth. Advertisementslast_img read more

Will the reefer trade go bananas over new design for larger-capacity vessels?

first_imgBy Alex Lennane 02/10/2013 A new conventional reefer ship design potentially offering considerably higher loading capacity and far quicker port loading times has been launched, targeting the banana trade between Latin America and Europe.The design – the result of the cooperation between veteran industry executive Birger Lindberg Skov, managing director of Reefer Intel, and one of the world’s largest ro-ro vessel operators, Stena – brings to the reefer sector the quarter stern ramp loading system often used on the ro-ro sector, particularly on pure car and truck carrying vessels, and would employ the cassette cargo hadling technology pioneered over the last decade on ro-ro vessels carrying Scandinavia’s paper exports.Presenting the new concept at last week’s Cool Logistics Conference in Rotterdam, Mr Skov said that for those banana shippers that wanted to remain in control of the end-to-end supply chains, investment in the conventional reefer vessels would be necessary as those in the existing fleet were aging and becoming increasingly inefficient, particularly given the current trend for slow steaming.“The reefer fleet is ageing and its vessels are hampered by very slow loading and discharge operations, which are also very manpower-intensive,” Mr Skov said. Although there has been some use of side loading technology for loading pallets onto conventional reefer ships that have been partially modified, the principle means of loading banana pallets is ships’ gear craning them into the holds, and then using gangs of stevedores to re-stow the banana boxes. Mr Skov claimed this operation typically lasts for 24-48 hours.In contrast, the new design would see pallets loaded onto cassettes which are then hauled up the quarter deck by translifters (picture below) or terminal tractors and onto the vessel’s four ro-ro decks, interconnected by fixed ramps and stowed in blocks.The vessel is also fitted with cranes to load reefer containers onto its weather deck, these two loading operations are able to be performed simultaneously, whereas on current conventional reefer vessels, loading containers can only take place once the main holds are loaded and the hatch covers replaced.The new vessels would have a capacity of 11,500 high cube pallets, or 621,000 banana boxes – with two-thirds loaded on cassettes and the remaining one-third in reefer containers. Mr Skov claimed this represented a 45% increase in carrying capacity over conventional reefer vessels of similar size.Stena RoRo managing director Per Westling said that the port turnaround times would be reduced by 50%, while also employing a vastly reduced workforce on the ports. “All you need is six drivers for the translifters and a few pointers, and the whole vessel can be turned around in 12 hours” he said.The main result of this is that it gives the shipping operator more opportunity to slow steam because extra time is built into the sailing schedule, thus dramatically reducing fuel bills and operating costs by up to 40% per cargo unit.The reduced port turnaround time would also allow a service operated by these ships to insert extra port calls. Today, a conventional reefer service between Latin America and Europe typically calls at two or three exports ports – Moin Costa Rica, Guayaquil in Ecuador, and Santa Marta and Turbo in Colombia among other – and two import ports in Europe, most commonl;y Dover and Antwerp.However, Mr Skov added the increased efficiencies would allow a call at Hamburg to also be included as well as a call at US east coast port on the return leg, which would allow the operator to attract backhaul cargo, such as automobiles to Jacksonville or Brunswick.However, the concept came under attack from container operators, who argued that the way the container shipping sector had already won so much market share from conventional ships proved that container shipping offered exporters better logistics cost throughout the entire cold chain.“The reefer ships have lost ground to containers, but not in the banana trade from Latin America to Europe, which is what this vessel is aimed for,” Mr Skov replied. “Today, conventional ships still have 72% share of that trade.”Kevin Bragg, managing director of Ecuadoran fruit producer Bonita Europe, responsible for around 8% of the banana market in Europe, said that with the widened Panama Canal due to be opened shortly, the vessel’s size – 119 metres long with a beam of 29 meters – could be too short in the future to provide sufficient economies of scale compared to container vessels.“It needs to be bigger, but then, in order to fill the vessel, you would have to get two or three producers together to charter it, and they will fight like hell.“Having said that – the design’s fantastic,” he said.However, Mr Westling said there was no technical reason why the ship’s dimensions were based on existing conventional reefer vessel size, but “there is no technical obstacle to builing this 25-30% bigger”.last_img read more