‘Covid-19 doesn’t take a break for house parties or social gatherings’ – Gardai issue weekend warning

first_img Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Electric Picnic By LaoisToday Reporter – 12th March 2021 Electric Picnic TAGSGardai RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Council Home News Crime ‘Covid-19 doesn’t take a break for house parties or social gatherings’ –… NewsCrime Gardai have pleaded for people not to have house parties or social gatherings this weekend.They say that they are still finding groups gathering in a range of different settings – in breach of regulations.These, they say are not just breaches of regulations, but are a risk to the individuals involved, their families and loved ones, and continue to put everybody’s health and the recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic at risk.While Gardai have also updated their statistics of the level of fines that have been issued.10,013 €100 fines for non-essential travel have been issued. 538 €500 fines for non-essential journeys to airports/ports – while the total number of €100 and €500 fines for non-essential journeys to airports/ports is 915.420 €500 fines for organising a house party and 1,620 €150 fines for attending a house party have also been issued.There have been 244 fines of €80 each for not wearing a face covering and 144 fines of €100 for non-essential travel by persons not ordinarily resident in the state.The latest stats show that Laois-Offaly Division have handed out 398 fines since the start of the year.Nationally, 75% of all fines have been issued to men while Sunday is the most popular day for fines.The 18-25 age group make up the highest proportion of fines with 52% of the total issued to this group.Gardai will be continuing nationwide checkpoints and high visibility patrols at public amenities, parks and beauty spots across the country this weekend in support of public health regulations.Speaking today, Laois-based Deputy Commissioner, Policing and Security, Anne Marie McMahon said: “The vast majority of people are complying with the public health regulations.“In doing so, they have made major sacrifices. This effort has saved many lives. We thank them for that.“Unfortunately, despite the constant public health advice, we are still seeing people attending house parties and other large social gatherings.“Going to such gatherings puts yourself, your loved ones, and everyone else you come into contact with after of getting COVID-19.“Everyone has a role to play in this. The best way of keeping safe this weekend is to stay home.“If you are going out, please stay within your 5km, limit your contacts with others, maintain social distancing, and regularly wash your hands.”SEE ALSO – Daniel and Majella O’Donnell to headline virtual St Patrick’s Day concert in Laois parish Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter ‘Covid-19 doesn’t take a break for house parties or social gatherings’ – Gardai issue weekend warning Previous articleCoronavirus: 10 further deaths and 646 new cases as Laois rate continues to fallNext articleDeaths in Laois – Saturday, March 13, 2021 LaoisToday Reporter Facebook Twitter Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date last_img read more

Desjardins to trim fees for two ETFs

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Companies Desjardins Global Asset Management Inc. IE Staff Montreal-based Desjardins Global Asset Management Inc. on Tuesday announced management fee reductions for two Desjardins exchange-traded funds, effective Aug. 23. The management fee for Desjardins Canadian Short Term Bond Index ETF (DCS) will fall to 0.09% from 0.15%, and the fee for Desjardins 1-5 year Laddered Canadian Government Bond Index ETF (DSG) will drop to 0.15% from 0.20%. center_img Facebook LinkedIn Twitter The changes are subject to approval by regulatory authorities.last_img read more

CBSA investigation leads to jail time for man convicted of smuggling

first_imgCBSA investigation leads to jail time for man convicted of smuggling From: Canada Border Services AgencyCBSA investigation leads to jail time for man convicted of smugglingProhibited blank pistolWhile ensuring that it enforces border measures associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) remains committed to keeping Canada safe. Today, the CBSA announced the successful resolution of a two-year investigation and prosecution leading to the conviction and sentencing of an individual from Durham Region for smuggling and other offences.In July 2018, Border Services Officers working at the Toronto International Mail Processing Centre seized a prohibited blank pistol arriving from Florida declared as “sporting goods.” The CBSA’s Criminal Investigators conducted a thorough investigation that resulted in the execution of two search warrants that identified Macauley Michael Fletcher, age 45, as the attempted smuggler. During the search of Fletcher’s residence criminal investigators seized a suitcase containing a firearms conversion kit, including tools to enable blank firearms to fire live rounds, as well as an over-capacity magazine and blank ammunition.Fletcher was arrested and charged with several offenses under both the Customs Act and the Criminal Code of Canada. He pled guilty in November 2019 and was sentenced on November 6, 2020 to 2 years and 8 months incarceration for the following offences:• Customs Act s.159 – attempt to smuggle prohibited goods• Criminal Code s. 92 (2) – possessing a prohibited device knowingly with no licence• Criminal Code s. 117.01 – contravening a prohibition orderAdditional multimediaOver capacity magazineQuotes“This is yet another example of CBSA vigilance, commitment and keen focus on enforcing Canada’s border laws. The smuggling of prohibited items over the border will be investigated and prosecuted to the fullest extent of our laws, and in support of the Government’s priorities.”Lisa Janes, CBSA Regional Director General, Greater Toronto Area RegionQuick factsFirearms and weapons are high-risk commodities and their interdiction is a CBSA enforcement priority.The CBSA and its domestic and international law enforcement partners work together to prevent illegal firearms and weapons from reaching our communities.If you have information about suspicious cross-border activity, please contact the CBSA Border Watch Toll free Line at 1-888-502-9060. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Border, Canada, commodities, covid-19, Criminal, Customs, device, Florida, Government, investigation, jail, licence, pistol, prosecution, resolution, Suspiciouslast_img read more

New CEO announced

first_imgNew CEO announced With the impending retirement of the current CEO, Moira Shire Councillors have been conducting an exhaustive search over several months for a new CEO.With a large field of applicants, the position attracted some quality candidates and Mayor Libro Mustica said he was thrilled to announce Clare Keenan had accepted the role and will commence as Moira Shire’s CEO in early July following a unanimous decision of Council.“Firstly though, I would like to thank Mark Henderson for his absolute dedication to the Council and the Moira community as a whole,” Cr Mustica said.“He came to us during a time of instability and steadied the ship, creating a respectful workplace where Councillors and staff could work as a team.“Mark has managed the organisation so we were able to embark on a huge shire-wide capital works program spanning libraries, sports pavilions, road construction, drainage, and bridges.“Mark leaves us with a very strong balance sheet, some large scale projects in the pipeline well supported by government grants, and a capable team to work with the incoming CEO.“Moira Shire has benefitted from his years of local government experience and we will all be sorry to see him go at the end of June.”Cr Mustica said the knowledge and enthusiasm Clare Keenan will bring to Moira Shire was exciting.“Clare comes to us from Burke Shire Council, situated in far North West Queensland on the Gulf of Carpentaria,” he said.“Prior to this, she held local and central government positions in New Zealand for more than 10 years, including as a Director of New Zealand’s Skills Strategy.“Clare has also worked in the commercial sector as a stock broker and was instrumental in building an Arab news service across 16 global locations, headquartered in Washington DC.“On behalf of Council, I am delighted to welcome Clare to her new role and new home here in Moira Shire.”With the announcement of her appointment to the CEO position, Clare said she was excited to be working with such a genuine and engaged group of Councillors and staff.“I have a focus on long term sustainability through economic development and diversification, and will advocate strongly for the infrastructure Moira Shire needs to achieve this,” Ms Keenan said.“I want young people in the Shire to see working at Council as an attractive career path, as well as to ensure all people feel included and think of Moira Shire Council as an ethical, energetic and reliable friend.“In order to have the dedication and energy required for the role of CEO, I believe you need to love the people and the place.“Moira Shire, with its many towns, natural beauty and unique communities, will be very easy for me and my family to fall in love with.“I can’t wait to start my new role and to meet you all.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:building, Clare, community, director, Economic Development, Government, infrastructure, local council, Moira, Moira Shire Council, New Zealand, pipeline, Queensland, retirement, Skills, sustainability, Victoria, Washingtonlast_img read more

CU-Boulder Dean Becomes President Of National Association Of Schools Of Music

first_imgDaniel Sher, dean of the University of Colorado at Boulder College of Music, has been named president of the National Association of Schools of Music. Sher had been the association’s vice president, but assumed leadership of the association Jan. 1 after outgoing president Karen Wolff resigned for family health reasons. Sher will serve as president through the association’s annual meeting in November, at which time he can be elected for a full term. The association is an organization of schools, conservatories, colleges and universities, with approximately 610 accredited institutional members. Founded in 1924, it establishes national standards for undergraduate and graduate music degrees and other credentials. Sher has been dean of the CU-Boulder College of Music since 1993. He received his bachelor’s degree from the Oberlin Conservatory, a master’s degree from the Juilliard School where he studied with Martin Canin and Rosina Lhevinne, and a doctorate in piano pedagogy from the Teachers College of Columbia University. Sher was previously on the piano faculty at the School of Music at Louisiana State University, where he served as dean from 1984 to 1993. He is a past president of Pi Kappa Lambda, the national honor society for music, and currently serves on that group’s Board of Regents. Sher appointed Jo Ann Domb of the University of Indianapolis to serve as vice president of the National Association of Schools of Music until the close of the 2006 annual meeting. For more information on the National Association of Schools of Music, visit http://nasm.arts-accredit.org/ Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Jan. 17, 2006 last_img read more

CU-Boulder To Launch Second Round Of K-12 Experiments On Shuttle Aug. 7

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: July 31, 2007 For the second time in eight months, a NASA space shuttle will carry a suite of University of Colorado at Boulder experiments to the International Space Station in an educational effort involving thousands of K-12 students around the world. Slated for launch Aug. 7 from Cape Kennedy, Fla., the space shuttle Endeavour will carry three experiments designed and built at CU-Boulder’s BioServe Space Technologies Center. Participants in the CSI-2 effort will chart the growth and development of tomato plants, yeast cell genes and a crystal “garden” in the weightless environment of space, which will be compared with similar experiments being conducted in K-12 classrooms around the world, said BioServe Director Louis Stodieck. The launch follows the December 2006 launch aboard Discovery of the BioServe payload, CSI-1, which carried plant seeds and tiny worms to the space station and involved hundreds of students from more than a dozen Front Range K-12 schools in Denver, Boulder, Longmont and Fort Collins. The activity of the seeds and worms was monitored remotely by about 7,000 students from the United States, Canada and Malaysia, who conducted similar classroom experiments on Earth using educational materials made available on the World Wide Web. BioServe is joining forces with two educational partners for the CSI-2 mission. One is Orion’s Quest, a Web-based education program based in Detroit that works closely with NASA and various schools on K-12 space education efforts. The second is the Adventures of the Agronauts progam at North Carolina State University, a free, online science curriculum with a space biology theme for elementary students. During the mission, images and video of the experiments will be downlinked to BioServe’s payload operations and control center on campus and then provided to the educational partners for distribution to participating K-12 schools, along with accompanying curriculum materials. BioServe hopes to engage additional K-12 schools for the upcoming 2007-08 school year in the United States and abroad, he said. “CSI-1 was a very successful educational venture that generated a great deal of interest,” said Stodieck, principal investigator for the payload. “We anticipate as many as 15,000 students and teachers will be directly participating in CSI-2 using educational materials available through our educational partners on the Internet.” One CSI-2 experiment will look at the seed germination and growth of several varieties of miniature, drought-tolerant tomato plants in space, which will sprout from seeds and grow to more than four inches — mature enough, potentially, to bear fruit. The experiment has implications for growing food during long-term space expeditions and for developing heartier varieties of tomato plants for farmers and gardeners on Earth. The second experiment will involve yeast cells, which have similar regulatory mechanisms to mammal cells and are model organisms for human systems, he said. Scientists have “knocked” out particular genes of the yeast cells, which will be studied through multiple generations in the low-gravity environment of space, he said. The yeast experiments also have applications to CSI-1 experiments on tiny worm species that reproduced through more than 20 generations on the space station – the most by any organism ever in space. The worms are being analyzed by several research groups interested in gene mutations caused by extended space radiation, a concern for NASA astronauts on deep-space missions, said BioServe researcher Carla Goulart. The third experiment, a fluid physics test, will examine the growth of metallic salts in the low gravity of the space station. A previous BioServe educational experiment in space indicated that silicate salts grow outward and then in a rotational pattern, unlike silicate gardens on Earth, which grow upward, said Stodieck. All three experiments will fly on BioServe’s Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus, or CGBA, a suitcase-sized payload that has been used to carry out life science and biomedical experiments on more than a dozen shuttle missions. BioServe also is collaborating with AeroGrow Co. of Boulder, Colo., which provided support and testing for the tomato-plant experiment, and with the Park Seed Co. of Anderson, S.C., which is donating tomato seed packets to schools. In a separate Endeavour experiment, BioServe is collaborating with a biotechnology company using mice to test a therapeutic drug to prevent muscle loss in space. One of the seven Endeavor astronauts, schoolteacher Barbara Morgan, will take part in several educational activities on the space station, said Stodieck. Morgan was the back-up to astronaut Christa McAuliffe, known as the “teacher in space,” who died along with six fellow astronauts in the 1986 Challenger space shuttle explosion that also killed CU-Boulder alum Ellison Onizuka. More information on BioServe can be found on the Web at: www.colorado.edu/engineering/BioServe/index.html. For information on Orion’s Quest go to: www.orionsquest.org/. Information on Adventures of Agronauts is available at www.ncsu.edu/project/agronauts. For additional information about BioServe, including information about participating in the K-12 space education program, call BioServe Business Development Manager Stefanie Countryman at (303) 735-5308 or email her at: [email protected]last_img read more

New CU-Boulder discoveries hold promise for treatment of Hepatitis B virus infection

first_imgDing Xue (Photo by Casey A. Cass/University of Colorado) Published: Oct. 22, 2012 “Our most important findings are the identification of the motif itself and the two HBx host targets,” said Xue of CU-Boulder’s molecular, cellular and developmental biology department. “Now we can start thinking about new drug targets to treat HBV.” A University of Colorado Boulder-led team has discovered two prime targets of the Hepatitis B virus in liver cells, findings that could lead to treatment of liver disease in some of the 400 million people worldwide currently infected with the virus.CU-Boulder Professor Ding Xue, who led the studies, said scientists have been looking for cellular targets of the Hepatitis B virus, or HBV, for more than three decades. Infections from HBV promote hepatitis (inflammation of the liver), cirrhosis (scarring of the liver) and liver cancer and can be transmitted through blood and bodily fluids, unprotected sex, unsterile needles and from infected mother to offspring during birth.Xue said scientists have known for some time that HBV encodes a pathogenic, tumor-promoting protein known as HBx, but how it works has remained largely unknown. In two new studies, Xue and his colleagues showed that the “host targets” of HBx in human cells are two small cell proteins known as Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, both of which are well-known cell death inhibitors but which have not previously been implicated in HBV infection.HBx uses a particular “motif,” a small string of protein building blocks known as amino acids that resemble those seen in some cell death-causing proteins, to interact with the Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL targets and stimulate an elevation of calcium in the host cell. The calcium elevation then triggers both viral HBV replication and cell death, said Xue.When the researchers introduced gene mutations into the motif, HBx binding to the Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins and viral replication were prevented. Similarly, when either Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL proteins were “knocked out” or weakened in human liver cells, HBx was less able to cause an increase in calcium and viral replication inside the infected cells.“Our most important findings are the identification of the motif itself and the two HBx host targets,” said Xue of CU-Boulder’s molecular, cellular and developmental biology department. “Now we can start thinking about new drug targets to treat HBV.”Two papers on the subject led by Xue were published online Oct. 22 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In addition to major CU-Boulder co-authors Xin Geng, Brian Harry, Qinghua Zhou, Yan Qin and Amy Palmer, a group led by Professor Ning-Shao Xia from the National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases at Xiamen University in China collaborated on one of the studies.The World Health Organization estimated in July that about 600,000 people die annually from acute or chronic HBV infection, which is most predominant in Asia and Africa.In one of the PNAS studies, the authors used a tiny roundworm known as C. elegans, a widely used animal model in biomedical research, to identify HBx host targets within the cell.  Xue and his team showed that HBx can induce cell death in C. elegans through a protein known as CED-9, mimicking an early stage of liver infection by HBV.Previous work had shown CED-9 in C. elegans is a homolog of the human Bcl-2 protein — a different protein in a different animal that has a similar function. Despite the stark differences between roundworms and humans, scientists estimate 35 percent of C. elegans genes have human homologs.“Our results suggest that C. elegans can serve as a good animal model for identifying crucial host factors and cell signaling pathways and aid in development of strategies to treat HBV-induced liver disorders,” said Xue. “I think the use of C. elegans will galvanize the field of HBV study, which has been in search of a good animal model for three decades.”Simple animal models like fruit flies and roundworms have been critical for understanding fundamental biological processes such as aging, cell death and the regulation of gene expression.  “Many would not have considered using C. elegans as a model to study HBV, but the genetic ‘tools’ of C. elegans are ideal for the identification of viral host targets, even though C. elegans is not a native host for the virus,” said CU’s Harry.  Harry is pursuing both a Ph.D. degree in MCD Biology at CU-Boulder and an M.D. at the CU School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora through the Medical Scientist Training Program.“Both studies show that if you create two mutations in this small HBx motif, it takes away its ability to bind to Bcl-2 family proteins. This wipes out viral replication and host cell death caused by HBx expression,” said Harry.Xue said there currently is no effective treatment for chronic HBV carriers, although some people with chronic HBV are treated with interferon and anti-viral drugs. But such treatments are either unavailable or too expensive in developing countries where most of the HBV infections are occurring.  “That’s why these new findings could have profound clinical and pharmaceutical implications for the treatment of HBV patients,” he said.Harry said the Hepatitis B vaccine, which was developed in 1982, is administered around the world and has been shown to work well in preventing new infections.  “The problem is that once you are infected, there is no effective way to remove the virus from the body,” he said. “When the virus replicates in liver cells, it causes cycles of cellular damage, inflammation and tissue regeneration, resulting in the accumulation of genetic mutations and liver cancer.” HBV is 50 to 100 times more infectious than the HIV virus, according to WHO officials. In China and other parts of Asia, most people acquire HBV during childhood and 8 to 10 percent of the adult population is chronically infected. “Because of this, understanding how HBV and HBx cause pathogenesis can have dramatic clinical impact,” said Xue.Funding for the two PNAS studies was provided by the National Institutes of Health grants F30 NS070596 and R01 GM059083, GM079097, GM088241 and GM084027.  Additional funding came from the China National Science Foundation and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.For more information on HBV visit http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs204/en/. For more information on CU-Boulder’s MCD Biology department visit http://mcdb.colorado.edu/.center_img Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Categories:AcademicsScience & TechnologyCampus CommunityNews Headlineslast_img read more

The odds of picking a perfect NCAA bracket, explained by a mathematician

first_imgDuke University v. University of Virginina | Durham, North Carolina | Jan. 12, 2012Do you have your 2017 NCAA men’s basketball tournament bracket filled out for the annual office pool? Just remember: You don’t need a perfect bracket, just one that tops those of your workmates.So what are the odds of filling out a perfect NCAA tournament bracket, picking all 63 games correctly? According to University of Colorado Boulder Professor Mark Ablowitz of the Department of Applied Mathematics, they are astonishing.Try about 1 in 9.2 quintillion (or about 1 in 9,223,000,000,000,000,000) for someone picking winners of each game randomly, like a coin flip, said Ablowitz. But anyone with some knowledge of college basketball can up their odds a bit, he notes. A 16-seed has  never upset a 1-seed in any of the four regions, for example, since the field expanded to 64 teams in 1985.“These aren’t just numbers,” said Ablowitz, who specializes in the mathematics of waves such as lasers and water waves. “The real essence here is the issue of the behavior of large numbers. When numbers get exponentially larger and larger, things get out of hand very, very quickly.”How good (or bad) are the odds? In 2014, billionaire businessman Warren Buffet offered up a $1-billion prize for anyone on the planet who could fill out a perfect bracket, a prize that went unclaimed. This year he is offering $1 million a year for life to any of his Berkshire Hathaway employees who pick the Sweet 16 field correctly.But even picking every team down to the Sweet 16 is a tough task, says Ablowitz—the odds of randomly guessing all of the winners here is about 1 in 282 trillion. “It’s still super-duper large, so no one is likely to get this one either,” he acknowledged.Some have calculated the odds of picking all 63 NCAA tournament games correctly would be about the same as shooting four hole-in-ones in a single round of golf, winning three consecutive Powerball lotteries, or the Denver Broncos winning the next 13 consecutive Super Bowls.Suppose one waits until the Sweet 16 is finalized before picking the winner of the championship game. The odds are better but still only 1 in 32,767, said Ablowitz, who did all the arithmetic on his pocket calculator. And to pick the winner of the final eight teams, the odds are 1 in just 127, if selected randomly.“I’m not a basketball maven,” says Ablowitz, a faculty member in the College of Engineering & Applied Science. “But if I wanted to improve my personal odds, I might look at 10 high-profile sports websites that gave the odds for each game, then averaged those. Using 10 sources rather than one source smooths the numbers out a little, so you wouldn’t be putting all of your money in one basket.”The final NCAA brackets will be announced on “Selection Sunday” March 12.Categories:Health & SocietyNews Headlines Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: March 10, 2017 • By Jim Scott last_img read more

David Parrish: The Veteran Wine Star Who’s Driving the Future of…

first_imgTwitter Email TAGSDavid ParrishParrish Family Vineyardpeople Share Facebook Pinterest ReddIt Home Industry News Releases David Parrish: The Veteran Wine Star Who’s Driving the Future of Parrish…Industry News ReleasesWine BusinessDavid Parrish: The Veteran Wine Star Who’s Driving the Future of Parrish Family VineyardBy Press Release – July 12, 2016 137 0 Linkedin AdvertisementAfter years working alongside visionaries including Robert Mondavi in Napa, the masterful winemaker continues to innovate and evolve his family’s award-winning winery.July 12, 2016 (Paso Robles, California) – As a child working the 740-acre vineyard planted in Atascadero by his grandfather, David Parrish knew he wanted a life among the rolling vine rows of wine country.Years later after graduating from UC Davis, Dr. Mark Kliewer, the then-head of his alma mater’s Viticulture Department, recruited Parrish to assist in a 5-acre vineyard trial exploring new trellis techniques. The trial not only helped boost Napa Valley vineyards, his work led Parrish to develop 24 proprietary patents for modern trellising systems and structures that are still used today.His trellising work caught the attention of the then-fledgling Napa community, and soon, in the late 1970s, Parrish was working alongside Napa’s most innovative grape growers, including the legendary Robert Mondavi.Mondavi and his neighbors believed Napa could be a world-class wine region, and that it all started in the vineyards.David Parrish helped them achieve that lofty goal.“It was quite an exciting time. None of us knew we were making history. We were just going for it and working our tails off,” says Parrish.“What I did know while working up there, and with Mondavi, was that this idea of transforming an area into a world-class region was not exclusive to Napa—that the same could be done in Paso Robles. To put it another way, as I finished up in Napa, I knew my work was just beginning.”With the vision of continuing the family legacy on the central coast, David planted 40 acres of Cabernet Sauvignon on his Creston ranch in 1995. In 2004, David crafted his first vintage of Cabernet Sauvignon; in 2011 he and his family opened the tasting room in Downtown Paso Robles; and in 2013 and 2014 he planted 80 acres in the Templeton Vineyard, and 30 acres in the Adelaida Vineyard.“Much has changed in Paso Robles since I was a kid working alongside my grandfather. We have become a world-class region and we’re dedicated to ensuring that continues for generations to come. Parrish Family Vineyard is proud to be part of this community that knows the key to great wine starts with the farming, and farming requires constant innovation,” says Parrish. “This brings up another thing I learned from my days working with Mondavi, that the key to success is to wake up every day with one single goal: to make each vintage better than the last.”Today, Parrish Family Vineyard is a notable marquee destination for discovering award-winning Cabernet Sauvignon and Bordeaux varietal wine. David and his family will be opening a new winery and tasting room in the Adelaida District of Paso Robles next year.ABOUT PARRISH FAMILY VINEYARDParrish Family Vineyard is a premiere producer of Cabernet Sauvignon from the Paso Robles, Adelaida District, and is dedicated to crafting sophisticated wine that represents the true varietal characteristics farmed on their coastal-influenced family vineyards in the preeminent Paso Robles region, including the Creston and Templeton Districts. Parrish Family Vineyard’s aim is to produce world-class Cabernet Sauvignon from their superior Adelaida Vineyard and inspire lasting experiences at your table or in their welcoming tasting room. Through their innovative approach and sustainability and philanthropic efforts, they work to be a positive force in the wine world and local community. Follow Parrish Family Vineyard on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, or visit www.parrishfamilyvineyard.com.Advertisement Previous articleElkhart Plastics, Inc. Hires Mark Nichols as South Bend Quality ManagerNext articleKorbel California Champagne Toasts VIP Golf Tournament Press Releaselast_img read more

Wildfire and Smoke Taint Insurance

first_imgLinkedin Pinterest Email Share Facebook Twitter ReddIt Home Video Wildfire and Smoke Taint InsuranceVideoWine Industry SpotlightsWildfire and Smoke Taint InsuranceBy Advertorial – October 19, 2020 646 0 AdvertisementBy Shannon Antonini, VP, Customer Risk ManagementAs wildfires threaten communities in California and beyond, many grape growers have faced a difficult 2020 harvest made even more challenging by the fast-moving fires and smoke that has filled the region. Even for the vineyards that have been spared from the ravages of fire, extreme smoke conditions can taint the grapes.As a general recommendation, producers who believe their crop has been impacted by fire, smoke or excessive heat should file a crop insurance claim with their crop insurance agent. To provide further guidance for our customers and other grape growers, we have compiled some of the most common questions about smoke taint and crop insurance.All policyholders who believe their crop has been impacted should contact their insurance agent immediately upon recognizing potential impact and open a notice of damage.A notice of damage is to be filed by the policyholder within 72 hours of the policyholder’s initial discovery of damage, but not later than 15 days after the end of the insurance period (for wine grapes in California, harvest or November 10th, whichever occurs earlier).What happens next after I file a notice of damage?After the insurance provider receives a notice of damage, it will be processed and, if necessary, a loss adjuster will be sent to inspect the damaged crop and gather information concerning the damage. If the policyholder wishes to destroy or not harvest the crop, the loss adjuster will gather the necessary information, conduct an appraisal to establish the crop’s remaining value and complete any forms needed.If the crop has been harvested or will not be harvested by the end of the insurance period, and the policyholder wishes to file a claim for indemnity, the loss adjuster will gather the appropriate information and assist the policyholder in filing the claim for indemnity. It is the policyholder’s responsibility to establish the time, location, cause and amount of any loss.How do I know if my grapes are eligible for a crop insurance claim?There are three criteria used to determine if wine grapes have been tainted by smoke. At least one of these criteria must be met to be eligible for a crop insurance claim.The fruit is rejected prior to harvest.You will need to obtain a smoke taint test from a lab. You will also need a rejection letter from the winery stating what fruit is being rejected and the reason (smoke taint due to multiple wildfires, etc.). You will be assessed a harvest fee for unharvested fruit. That fee will vary based on the county; the fee in Sonoma County is $200/ton.Fruit is harvested and then juice needs to be disposed of.You still need the smoke taint test prior to harvest, weigh tags and a rejection letter from the winery. The winery will need to keep that juice separate and the insurance company has the right to witness disposal. We will need to notify the company where and when the disposal will take place. If the juice is mixed and loses its identity, it is no longer covered.Fruit is harvested and made into wine, but the price is reduced due to smoke.You may be eligible for payment based on the Quality Adjustment Calculation. This will depend on how many tons are harvested and the price. A smoke taint test is still needed prior to harvest accompanied by a letter from the winery.There are a limited number of labs approved to handle smoke taint testing. Talk to your agent if you are not certain a lab is approved, and get samples sent in as soon as possible. If you are waiting for test results before you harvest and the fruit begins to deteriorate, you may run into issues with crop insurance. In this case, it is important to get an appraisal done if the fruit is ready to harvest. Be sure that you are asking for the appraisal when the fruit is ripe and ready to pick.Crop insurance coverage deadlines are fast approaching for the 2021 season. Eligibility includes vines in their fourth growing season or third season after grafting. Minimum coverages begins at 50 percent and maximum coverage is 85 percent of the approved average yield. The last day to sign up for the 2021 crop year is January 31, 2021.Contact a Risk Management SpecialistShannon Antonini is an experienced risk management specialist for the wine industry. American AgCredit’s Wine Country Crop Insurance agents are Emily Carvajal and Shannon Antonini based in Petaluma, CA. To open a notice of damage or inquire about crop insurance please contact them directly at 707.766.8498 or [email protected][email protected] For a full FAQ about Smoke Taint and Crop Insurance, visit: https://www.agloan.com/smoke-taint-information-for-wine-producers/.This material is for informational purposes only and cannot be relied on to replace your own judgment or that of the risk management professionals you work with, in assessing the accuracy or relevance of the information to your own operations.SEND ME INFOAdvertisement TAGSAmerican AgCreditCrop InsuranceShannon AntoniniSmoke Taint Previous articleAfternoon Brief, October 16Next articleRepublic National Distributing Company Matches Constellation Brands’ Donation to California Wildfire Relief Funds Advertoriallast_img read more